Femaleness

 
I have chosen to no longer be apologetic for my femaleness and my femininity. And I want to be respected in all of my femaleness because I deserve to be.
— Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: We should all be feminists TED Talk
 
 

10 years ago this summer, I had the privilege of meeting Chimamanda Adichie while she was on the book tour for "Purple Hibiscus." Her work has continued to have a profound impact, but even more so lately. If you haven't listened to her TED Talk on feminism, it is life *clap* changing *clap.* 

While the implications of the gender gap can be broad, more often than not, they are subtle. One day, the inequality will have evolved so that no one will need to worry about it at all, but for now it unfortunately but certainly exists. I love the way Ms. Adichie explains women's roles over time when she says:

 
...A thousand years ago because human beings lived then in a world in which physical strength was the most important attribute for survival. The physically stronger person was more likely to lead, and men, in general, are physically stronger. Of course there are many exceptions.

But today we live in a vastly different world. The person more likely to lead is not the physically stronger person; it is the more creative person, the more intelligent person, the more innovative person, and there are no hormones for those attributes. A man is as likely as a woman to be intelligent, to be creative, to be innovative. We have evolved; but it seems to me that our ideas of gender had not evolved.
— Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: We should all be feminists TED Talk
 

There are so many stereotypes around this word that I really haven't considered myself a part of "the feminist group" in the past. However, I have never broken down these concepts; I've never thought about it the way she describes. The term "feminist" seemed so abrasive and argumentative, and for those who know me, I do not fit into the category of either of those adjectives. Now I'm thinking this word fits me more than ever. Chimamanda has inspired me to look beyond my "I'm sorry's" and "it was just luck" excuses, and to begin owning what makes me unique -- one of those things is that I am female, and will not apologize for my femaleness.